[spsp-members] Workshop, Talk, Networking - Marine Science Studies

elisjones315 at gmail.com elisjones315 at gmail.com
Tue Mar 28 17:04:48 UTC 2023


Dear all

See below details for three events (in person and online) related to the
history, philosophy and social studies of marine science.

Best wishes

Elis 

 

Three Interdisciplinary Marine Events - Workshop, Public Talk and Networking
- University of Exeter/Online - April 2023

In April the University of Exeter's Egenis Centre for the Study of Life
Sciences will host a free interdisciplinary marine workshop bringing
together marine scientists and scholars from history, philosophy and social
studies of science. This will also include a public talk by Prof. Stefan
Helmreich (MIT). Both the workshop and public talk will also be streamed
online. In the run up to this there will be an online speed networking event
for people from all disciplines who do work relevant to marine issues (19th
April). More info below, or at www.marinesciencestudies.co.uk
<http://www.marinesciencestudies.co.uk> .  Please contact Elis Jones
(erj205 at exeter.ac.uk) if you have any questions.

 

1.	Networking Event: Ocean Partnerships - Blue Humanities, Marine
Science and Science Studies: Interdisciplinary Dialogues - 19th April,
1-2pm, Online

Speed networking event via Zoom for marine-oriented researchers. Organised
by
<https://www.smmr.org.uk/ocean-partnerships-a-new-networking-opportunity/>
Ocean Partnerships and the Sustainable Management of UK Marine Resources
project. Ocean Partnerships meet monthly for lunchtime speed networking
where attendees get to meet people from different disciplines and sectors to
spark up new ideas for future collaboration! Each month has a different
theme to help start the conversation. This month's theme has been chosen
Elis Jones from the University of Exeter. Join us on the 19nd April 1-2pm
(UK time) to discuss Blue Humanities, Marine Science and Science Studies.
Join Ocean Partnerships a network of over 300 scientists, artists,
policymakers, science communicators and more. who are interested in the
marine environment and the people and communities that rely upon it. Sign up
to our mailing list to be keep up to date with the latest events:
https://mailchi.mp/345558664bbf/ocean-partnerships-network
<https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmailchi.m
p%2F345558664bbf%2Focean-partnerships-network&data=05%7C01%7CJ.Canada%40exet
er.ac.uk%7Ce7660554a7bf412725ba08db1eec3333%7C912a5d77fb984eeeaf321334d8f04a
53%7C0%7C0%7C638137772029816922%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAi
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2%2BaCqMSON0vBSZN2SIKAru%2Bz%2FoJIu7sZfd%2Fg%3D&reserved=0> 

Many disciplines across science and the humanities are seeing increasing
engagement with the ocean. This includes disciplines sometimes called the
'Blue Humanities', as well as those which study the practice of science
itself, including philosophy, history and social studies of science, broadly
termed 'Science Studies'. This speed networking session will bring together
people from marine science with those from these disciplines to discuss and
engage with each other's work, and to get a sense for the exciting
developments taking place across the full breadth of ocean scholarship. Sign
up via the link here:
<https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fus02web.z
oom.us%2Fmeeting%2Fregister%2FtZYtdemsrTkqH9aNWf6LmKeieSLc6NfJCqEa&data=05%7
C01%7CJ.Canada%40exeter.ac.uk%7Ce7660554a7bf412725ba08db1eec3333%7C912a5d77f
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8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7
C%7C%7C&sdata=%2Flu7b3eL5geOsdEY2NeU29CHBTcXxDWNplkQduOjXho%3D&reserved=0>
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYtdemsrTkqH9aNWf6LmKeieSLc6NfJCqE
a

2.	Workshop: Values at Sea - Science Studies meets Marine Biology -
27-28th April, University of Exeter and via Zoom.

Across many disciplines, attention is increasingly focused on the sea. This
is no surprise: it is a site of immense value, supporting and shaping the
global biosphere, and is under considerable threat. Whilst ocean ecosystems
are pushed to the brink, scholars now often talk of the blue humanities and
oceanic turns, of blue economics and accelerations, and of ocean decades.
These trends necessitate a similar refocusing towards the sea in the
history, philosophy, and social studies of science, fields that are well
placed to help understand and contextualise some of the changes occurring to
marine systems. To facilitate the emergence of social studies of marine
life, as well as the integration of such scholarship with biological and
ecological research, this two-day seminar will bring together people engaged
in and focused on interactions between scientists and the sea. The
discussion will centre on values in marine contexts: that is, the ways in
which oceans and ocean life come to matter to humans and other species.

 

By bringing together those working within marine sciences, those studying
the work done in those sciences, and those offering other perspectives on
the sea, we aim to nurture and strengthen cross-disciplinary understandings
of how the ocean is, has been, and can be valued. Speakers from ecology and
social sciences will present work on the biology and ecology of the sea and
its interactions with people, as well as from science studies to discuss how
knowledge and value are produced in these contexts.  Registration here
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/523035532357

 

3.	Public Talk: Ocean Waves, Ocean Science, Ocean Media - Prof. Stefan
Helmreich, MIT - 28th April, 9:30-11:00am, University of Exeter and via
Zoom.  

How do oceanographers apprehend ocean waves? This presentation draws on
anthropological work I undertook among wave scientists in the United States
to argue that what oceanographers take ocean waves to be has been strongly
imprinted by the techniques, technologies, and media - maritime,
photographic, filmic, information theoretic - through which waves have come
to be known. I offer an account of ethnographic fieldwork I conducted on
board the Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP), a seagoing vessel managed by
the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, in La Jolla, California. FLIP is a
singular vessel, one that, once at sea, can "flip" 90 degrees into a
vertical position -with all the instrumentation inside swiveling
correspondingly-to become a stable platform from which to measure wave
action. Moving from an examination of the contemporary use of infrared and
laser imaging to study waves from FLIP, I place the platform within a longer
history of wave science, reaching back into the Cold War, when ocean
observation projects were conditioned by nuclear-age American maritime
expansion, particularly in the Pacific. I then flip to the recent present,
as scientists turn from understanding waves not only as a kind of
infrastructure for maritime networks, but also as avatars of anthropogenic
climate change. Register here https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/522142531367

 

These events are supported by South West Doctoral Training Partnership,
Marie Skłodowska-Curie Action 885794, the Egenis Centre for the Study of
Life Sciences and the journal History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.

 

 

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